Seasoned yet seeking

You know what you’re good at and where your strengths lie as a coach: communication, compassion, helping people find their intrinsic motivation. You’re naturally empathetic and believe that if more people had personalized support, they’d be far more likely to overcome bad habits and achieve better health.

Whether you’re certified as a coach or not, your frustration springs from the belief that you could do more if you understood more about the complex chronic conditions your clients are facing or how to better personalize their diets. You wish you had greater command of the Functional Medicine approach and the future of medicine and a keener understanding of how our modern environment and diet are causing 90 percent of the chronic conditions people face today.

Although you understand more than the average person, you can’t help but feel that there are some holes in your own knowledge that keep you from offering better support and direction.

I’ve long said that coaches play a critical role in the (r)evolution of healthcare and that the collaboration among licensed clinicians (doctors, nurses, physician assistants) and non-licensed practitioners (nutritionists, coaches) is going to be central to the future of medicine.

The true priority of a coach is to empower people to discover their own goals, solutions, and strategies, not to give advice or tips or “teach.”

That means you don’t need a medical degree or advanced technical skill to be a more effective and powerful coach. What you do need is a framework that allows you to see how all of this works together—so that you can bring all your skills to bear in ways that are not only most effective, but more fulfilling for you as a coach.

You’d also benefit from a solid business model so that you can make your coaching career not just enjoyable, but sustainable.

Interested in the Health Coach Training Program?

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